FeaturePolitics

MY POLITICS IS NOT A CAREER BUT ACTIVISM

Just two years ago during the SRC elections, when every political organisation in the university was campaigning, Dimane got introduced to the life of politics when her twin sister, Anathi Dimane invited her to a manifesto. She says it was interesting and and further promised herself that she will gather  more knowledge about the parties. Little did she know that her activism in politics has just began!

The young lady then made her way into politics by choosing the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL).  

“I chose the ANCYL first because of their visibility on campus and not only do they exist in our institutions of higher learning but also in our communities. The ANCYL led me to the mother body being the ANC itself.”

Dimane adds: “When I joined the student movement, I had no idea what I was doing but due to my strong will to learn, I joined and was very fortunate to find former leaders of my campus who are members of the Progressive Youth Alliance (PYA). I read and attended political class until I understood what I was getting myself into. I didn’t even think I stood stand a chance but people whom I surrounded myself with and elected me knew.” 

Like every industry, politics also has its fair share of challenges that one faces throughout their journey. The young activist faced sexiest challenges with men doubting her role in politics.

“When we ‘women’ are about to be elected, men usually measure a female’s political influence with her sexual life. These are the many challenges women in politics face.”

In-depth measures of Unathi’s role on campus and the lives of students’ led me to University student, Sandile Thusi. Thusi had faced various challenges from accommodation to funding until he went to the (DS) office, where he met Dimane.

“I had financial issues with no funding and that led me into debt with the place I used to rent and that is when I went to Damani’s OFFICE. She made a few phone calls begging housing to get me residency.

“I faced issues relating to my sexuality and people never understood my homosexuality. I faced alot of prejudice and homophobic acts towards me and that’s when I went back to her and disclosed my issues. She referred me to Bayanda Zulu from housing and after that,I received a single room where I’m currently staying alone.”

Thusi adds that he’s not the only student that Dimane managed to help, there is a lot more. “She’s a good example for women in the SRC, there was a rape protest on campus that she held alongside other women on campus and she held that flag high I must say.”

This UKZN’s brightest young mind was also inaugurated by the student governance and leadership development of the university.

“My proudest moments would be taking part in launching the young womens’ desk on our campus. There is a need for women to mobilize themselves in order to occupy every space and help assist every student that comes to the office with no hope of getting registered or where they’ll get their next meal.

“Seeing students leave my office with smiles on their faces due to my assistance and help, is my ‘BIGGEST and PROUDEST Moment in Politics’, says Dimane.”

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